Deep Enteroscopy

What is Deep Enteroscopy?
Also known as balloon-assisted enteroscopy, a long endoscopy (a flexible tube with a light and camera attached to it) is advanced into the small intestine for both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes.  The balloon moves through the small bowel by alternately inflating and deflating balloons and presenting the small bowel to the physician by pleating the bowel over an overtube, just like pulling a curtain over a rod.

Why is it done?
Your physician may recommend this procedure if you have problems in the small intestine including bleeding, narrowing of the intestine, abnormal tissue, polyps, or tumors.

What Can I Expect during the Deep Enteroscopy Procedure?
 This procedure may take several hours, depending on the therapy needed.  It is often performed with general anesthesia although some patients may only require moderate sedation.  Fluoroscopy or the use of x-ray may be used.  Most procedures are performed through the mouth (antegrade) although through the rectum (retrograde) may allow better access to lesions in the lower part of the bowel.