Esophageal Manometry

What is the Esophagus?
The esophagus is a muscular tube that connects your throat to your stomach. With each swallow, the esophagus muscle contracts and pushes food into the stomach. At the upper and lower end of the esophagus, a valve (a special sphincter muscle) remains closed except when food or liquid is swallowed or when you belch or vomit.

What is esophageal manometry?
Esophageal manometry measures the pressures and the pattern of muscle contractions in your esophagus. Abnormalities in the contractions and strength of the muscle or in the sphincter at the upper and lower end of the esophagus can result in chest pain, heartburn, and/or difficulty swallowing.

Why is it performed?
Esophageal manometry is used to diagnose the conditions that can cause these symptoms.

What can I expect during the test?
Prior to taking the test, your doctor will talk to you regarding the fasting time and your current medications. A healthcare professional will apply a cream to numb the inside of your nostrils. Then a thin, flexible, lubricated tube will be passed through your nose and advanced into your stomach while you swallow sips of water. Mild, brief gagging may occur while the tube is passed through the throat. When the tube is in position, you will be sitting upright or lying on your back while the tube is connected to a computer. Once the test begins it is important to breathe slowly and smoothly, remain as quiet as possible and avoid swallowing unless instructed to do so. As the tube is slowly pulled out of your esophagus, the computer measures and records the pressures in different parts of your esophagus. During the test, you may experience some discomfort in your nose and/or throat. The test will take approximately 30 minutes to complete and the results will be sent to your doctor’s office.

17 W. Red Bank Avenue, Suite 306
Woodbury, NJ 08096
(856) 315-1000